The didactic curriculum for the Physician Assistant (M.S.) Degree program consists of four terms and is the preparation for the fifth, sixth and seventh terms which are devoted to clinical activities. Additionally, you will be allowed one elective to help establish further training in one of the core requirements or explore other clinical interests.

During the clinical phase students will return to the Physician Assistant Institute (PAI) for clerkship evaluations, examination and Medical Seminars. During Medical Seminar, students will continue with clinical lectures and education in Integrated Medicine, Global Health themes and Medical Ethics. The capstone project will be due in the seventh and final term of the course of study.

Learn more about *Core Supervised Clinical Clerkships (Rotations).

First Term

This course is designed to provide an introduction to the functional anatomy of the human body. Students will have the opportunity to locate, identify, and dissect all major muscular, nervous, vascular, bony, and soft tissue structures using cadaveric specimens.
Credits: 4

This course offers a fundamental and integrated approach to human physiology with emphasis on the study of the body’s functional system from a medical perspective.
Credits: 2

This course is designed to provide the basic pathophysiologic understanding of diseases and the resulting clinical presentation.
Credits: 2

This course will provide the student with advanced microbiology, virology and immunology to understand the complexities of infectious disease. Emphasis will be placed on clinically relevant pathogens, isolation and aseptic techniques, identification and treatment.
Credits: 3

This course is a practical, evidence-based approach to educate and counsel patients in order to improve lifestyle, increase adherence, and reduce medical errors.
Credits: 2

This ongoing course focuses on developing the skills of obtaining a comprehensive history and a problem focused history; performing a comprehensive screening exam and an appropriate problem focused exam; the ability to integrate and interpret the findings from these to create a foundation for further clinical evaluation. Emphasis is placed on identifying normal versus abnormal findings and on accurate and appropriate documentation.
Credits: 3

This course provides students with the basic terminology, concepts and methods of research in order to be able to locate, evaluate and apply current evidence to clinical practice.
Credits: 3

This course familiarizes students with concepts of cellular and molecular biology; different types of mutations and their effects; inheritance patterns; genetic testing techniques; counseling referrals and key resources with an emphasis on accurately creating and interpreting the pedigree in regards to disease identification and/or susceptibility, therapeutic options, and future clinical applications of genetics in primary care.
Credits: 2

This course introduces the student to the basic principles of pharmacology, including mechanisms of action; absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion; pharmacokinetics; interactions with other drugs and with food; problems with special populations (prenatal, neonatal, elderly); rational drug usage for clinical disorders (therapeutics): clinical measures; and toxicologynetics in primary care.
Credits: 1

First Term Total Credits: 22

Second Term

This course is designed to provide the basic pathophysiologic understanding of diseases and the resulting clinical presentation.
Credits: 2

This course builds on Anatomy I investigating the functional anatomy of the human body by offering students the opportunity to locate, identify, and dissect all major muscular, nervous, vascular, bony, and soft tissue structures using cadaveric specimens.
Credits: 4

This course builds on Physiology I to offer a fundamental and integrated approach to human physiology with emphasis on the study of the body’s functional system from a medical perspective.
Credits: 2

This ongoing course builds on H&P I in developing skills of obtaining a comprehensive history and a problem focused history; performing a comprehensive screening exam and an appropriate problem focused exam; the ability to integrate and interpret the findings from any of these to create a foundation for further clinical evaluation. Emphasis is placed on identifying normal versus abnormal findings and on accurate and appropriate documentation.
Credits: 4

This course builds on Introduction to Clinical Pharmacology with advanced principles of pharmacology, including mechanisms of action; absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion; pharmacokinetics; interactions with other drugs and with food; problems with special populations (prenatal, neonatal, elderly); rational drug usage for clinical disorders (therapeutics): clinical measures; and toxicology.
Credits: 2

This ongoing body systems based course integrates all the skills and learning from the curriculum as related to medical problems encountered in the primary care setting. Emphasis is on the integration of anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, microbiology, history and exam findings and diagnostic procedures in order to formulate a differential diagnosis; on ordering and interpreting diagnostic tests in order to develop a working diagnosis; and on developing and implementing treatment plans including as needed therapeutic procedures, pharmacology, referral and patient education and counseling.
Credits: 8

This ongoing body systems based course integrates all the skills and learning from the curriculum as related to medical problems encountered in the primary care setting. Emphasis is on the integration of anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, microbiology, history and exam findings and diagnostic procedures in order to formulate a differential diagnosis; on ordering and interpreting diagnostic tests in order to develop a working diagnosis; and on developing and implementing treatment plans including as needed therapeutic procedures, pharmacology, referral and patient education and counseling.
Credits: 1

This ongoing course utilizes a variety of techniques designed to supplement and integrate content from all didactic courses, including but not limited to: small group interaction; problem based learning; case based learning; simulation lab; reflective discussion and literature critique.
Credits: 2

Second Term Total Credits: 25

Third Term

This ongoing course builds on H&P I and II in developing skills of obtaining a comprehensive history and a problem focused history; performing a comprehensive screening exam and an appropriate problem focused exam; the ability to integrate and interpret the findings from any of these to create a foundation for further clinical evaluation. Emphasis is placed on identifying normal versus abnormal findings and on accurate and appropriate documentation.
Credits: 4

This course builds on Clinical Pharmacology I with more advanced principles of pharmacology, including mechanisms of action; absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion; pharmacokinetics; interactions with other drugs and with food; problems with special populations (prenatal, neonatal, elderly); rational drug usage for clinical disorders (therapeutics): clinical measures; and toxicology.
Credits: 2

This ongoing body systems based course integrates all the skills and learning from the curriculum as related to medical problems encountered in the primary care setting. Emphasis is on the integration of anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, microbiology, history and exam findings and diagnostic procedures in order to formulate a differential diagnosis; on ordering and interpreting diagnostic tests in order to develop a working diagnosis; and on developing and implementing treatment plans including as needed therapeutic procedures, pharmacology, referral and patient education and counseling.
Credits: 8

This course incorporates the history, development, certification, licensure, reimbursement and key organizations of the PA profession as well as the role of the PA in public health and state and federal policy making.
Credits: 2

This course will emphasize disease prevention, health promotion during various stages of life with emphasis on the pediatric and geriatric population.
Credits: 2

This course presents the student with the four topic method of evaluation of Ethical issues. Each student will look at the ethical issue presented looking at Medical indications, patient preferences, quality of life and contextual features to provide a response to the ethical dilemma. The course will provide a foundation for the student to work through ethical dilemmas provided by the professor. During this course the student will identify and evaluate ethical issues of their own and touch upon options and solutions and provide the student with the ability to employ those methods throughout their career.
Credits: 2

This course is designed to provide the basic pathophysiologic understanding of diseases and the resulting clinical presentation.
Credits: 2

This course builds on Physiology I to offer a fundamental and integrated approach to human physiology with emphasis on the study of the body’s functional system from a medical perspective.
Credits: 2

This ongoing course exposes students to the philosophies, concepts, techniques and practice of a variety of alternative and complementary medicine.
Credits: 2

This ongoing course utilizes a variety of techniques designed to supplement and integrate content from all didactic courses, including but not limited to: small group interactions; problem based learning; case based learning; simulation lab; reflective discussion and literature critique.
Credits: 2

Third Term Total Credits: 28

Fourth Term

This ongoing body systems based course integrates all the skills and learning from the curriculum as related to medical problems encountered in the primary care setting. Emphasis is on the integration of anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, microbiology, history and exam findings and diagnostic procedures in order to formulate a differential diagnosis; on ordering and interpreting diagnostic tests in order to develop a working diagnosis; and on developing and implementing treatment plans including as needed therapeutic procedures, pharmacology, referral and patient education and counseling.
Credits: 8

This course presents the fundamentals of the approach to surgery and the surgical patient. Emphasis is on pre-, intra- and post-operative care; surgical skills and techniques; management of complications, and patient education and counseling.
Credits: 4

This course builds on Information Literacy I by integrating and applying those skills by requiring students to write in various scientific and medical formats.
Credits: 2

This course offers the student the opportunity to investigate the impact of health issues in other countries and the interactive affect on all populations in terms of epidemiology, disease, disasters, economics, health initiatives, ethics and policy.
Credits: 2

This ongoing course exposes students to the philosophies, concepts, techniques and practice of a variety of alternative and complementary medicine.
Credits: 2

This ongoing course utilizes a variety of techniques designed to supplement and integrate content from all didactic courses, including but not limited to: small group interaction; problem based learning; case based learning; simulation lab; reflective discussion and literature critique.
Credits: 2

This course builds on Clinical Pharmacology II with additional advanced case-based principles of pharmacology, including mechanisms of action; absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion; pharmacokinetics; interactions with other drugs and with food; problems with special populations (prenatal, neonatal, elderly); rational drug usage for clinical disorders (therapeutics): clinical measures; and toxicology.
Credits: 1

One of the core supervised clinical clerkships for the Physician Assistant student.
Credits: 4

Fourth Term Total Credits: 25

Fifth Term

One of the core supervised clinical clerkships for the Physician Assistant student.
Credits: 4

One of the core supervised clinical clerkships for the Physician Assistant student.
Credits: 4

One of the core supervised clinical clerkships for the Physician Assistant student.
Credits: 4

This is a continuation of the didactic course. During this course, presented in the supervised clinical experience period, topics in Clinical Medicine, Integrative Medicine, Global Health and Medical Ethics are presented.
Credits: 2

Fifth Term Total Credits: 14

Sixth Term

One of the core supervised clinical clerkships for the Physician Assistant student.
Credits: 4

One of the core supervised clinical clerkships for the Physician Assistant student.
Credits: 4

This is the capstone research project where the student is required to complete and submit their research paper of publishable quality to the faculty.
Credits: 2

This is a continuation of the didactic course. During this course, presented in the supervised clinical experience period, topics in Clinical Medicine, Integrative Medicine, Global Health and Medical Ethics are presented.
Credits: 2

Sixth Term Total Credits: 12

Seventh Term

One of the core supervised clinical clerkships for the Physician Assistant student.
Credits: 4

An elective specialty supervised clinical experiences for the Physician Assistant student.
Credits: 4

This is a course designed for the term 7 student who has completed their didactic phase and their clinical rotations. This course is to prepare the graduating PA student for licensure, professional practice, and for the PANCE exam.
Credits: 4

Seventh Term Total Credits: 12