Criminal Justice

The Criminal Justice Track prepares students careers in law enforcement, corrections, security and forensics. Required courses in the program include Criminology, the American Legal System, Sociology of Deviance, and Juvenile Delinquency. Criminal justice courses taken in other accredited institutions that are a C or higher are transferable. UB Criminal Justice track students are also encouraged to take courses in Martial Arts and foreign languages. Internships with law enforcement agencies are available.

Students interested in Criminal Justice will graduate with a B.A. in Social Science and also will have earned a minor in Criminal Justice. The B.A. in Social Science/Criminal Justice track provides an excellent introduction to social science methods, which prepare students for objective assessment and analysis of situations. The Social Science program allows students to explore all of the social sciences while preparing for a career in criminal justice. Recent graduates in the Criminal Justice track have gone on to pursue graduate study in criminal justice and have also been employed in the police work and in federal agencies involved in security.In order to complete the Criminal Justice Track students are required to complete the following courses:

SOC 188x Introduction to Criminal Justice 3 Semester Hours
SOC 315 Criminology 3 Semester Hours
PSCI 233 Introduction to the American Legal System 3 Semester Hours or
PSCI 101 American Government 3 Semester Hours
SOC 311 Juvenile Delinquency 3 Semester Hours or
SOC 270 Sociology of Deviance 3 Semester Hours or
HUSV 315 Substance Abuse and Chemical Dependency 3 Semester Hours
PSCI 333 The Terror Network 3 Semester Hours
SOC 398 Internship in Criminal Justice 3 Semester Hours

The Social Sciences major is designed to provide students with a liberal arts experience from the perspective of the social sciences. It is innovative both in its interdisciplinary approach to subject matter and the options it offers students to pursue their goals, whether in graduate school or government or the foreign service, in international agencies or business, in the law, teaching or community service. In addition to completing the major (i.e. meeting the requirements indicated in Groups I & II), students may choose to add (i) concentrations in History, International Studies, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, or (ii) minors in career-related areas such as International Business, Finance, Human Services, and Education. Career opportunities traditionally available to liberal arts students are much enhanced by the flexibility the Social Science major permits. In its interdisciplinary approach, its emphasis on breadth as well as depth of learning, and its focus on practical skills, the Social Science major prepares students for success in their careers, for leadership roles in their communities and the world, and for self-fulfillment.

 

Concentration in Social Science

The Criminal Justice Track is designed for students interested in law enforcement. Internships with law enforcement agencies are available. Required courses include Criminology, the American Legal System, Sociology of Deviance, and Juvenile Delinquency. Criminal Justice students are encouraged to take courses in Martial Arts and foreign languages. The Social Science major offers concentrations in criminal justice, political science, international studies, economics, sociology, and psychology. It provides an excellent introduction to social science methods and it makes it possible to explore all of the social sciences while preparing for a career in criminal justice.

 

Honor Societies

Students in the Social Science Criminal Justice track who excel in the program are eligible for induction into the Beta Chapter of Pi Gamma Mu, the International Social Science Honor Society. Membership in the society offers a number of benefits including an automatic GD-7 grade as a beginning employee for the Federal government.

 

Job and Internship Opportunities

Students in the Criminal Justice track intern with State and City police in Connecticut and New York. Students have also interned for Federal Agencies. Graduates of this program work with municipal and State police forces and with Federal security agencies. They have also been accepted into top graduate programs in criminal justice including the John Jay College of Criminal Justice and the Henry C. Lee College of Criminal Justice and Forensic Sciences.

 

Faculty

William D. Lay oversees the study of Criminal Justice in the College of Public and International Affairs. He is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin where he majored in Chemistry. He earned his Juris Doctor at Columbia University where he served as Senior Editor of the Columbia Law Review. Upon graduation he served as the law clerk of the Honorable Joseph W. Bellacosa, Chief Justice of the Court of Appeals, State of New York, the highest court in the State of New York. He worked with Judge Bellacosa at a time that criminal law in New York underwent major reforms. Turning to private practice he joined the Law Firm of Skadden, Arps, the largest and one of the most prestigious law firm in the United States. He also has served with the Office of the Appellate Defender in New York City.

 

Beth Skott is Chair of Social Sciences. She is a graduate of the University of Delaware and the University of Connecticut where she earned her Ph.D. in Sociology. Dr. Skott advises Social Science students in the fields of Criminal Justice, Psychology, and Pre-Law. Dr. Skott teaches Research Methods on the Graduate and Undergraduate level and she is under contract with Sage Publishers for a book on the teaching of Research Methods. Dr. Skott teaches Criminology and Introduction to Criminal Justice and Social Deviance in the Criminal Justice track.

 

Ryan Knox earned his Juris Doctor from University of Connecticut School of Law and his B.A. from Wesleyan University, majoring in government and psychology. Dr. Ryan A. Knox earned his Juris Doctor from the University of Connecticut School of Law, and earned his B.A. from Wesleyan University, majoring in government and psychology. He also completed an intensive study on the American Presidency at Yale University. Dr. Knox was a founding member of the University of Connecticut School of Law’s Academic Careers Society, and worked for the General Assembly of the State of Connecticut. Dr. Knox conducted an in depth analysis and assessment of the recently adopted South African Constitution. He was the winner in the South African Moot Court competition adjudicated by Chief Justice Ralph Zulman of the South African Supreme Court of Appeals (South Africa’s highest court). Prior to law school he worked in conjunction with social service agencies and law-enforcement to help youthful offenders to rehabilitate their lives. He has also served as an advisor and speech writer to several national political campaigns.

 

Dr. Stephen Healey, who holds degrees in Religion and Society from Eastern Nazarene College, Andover Newton Theological School, and Boston College, is the Director of the World Religions Program and the Interim Chair of the Social Science Program. His research and publications have focused on Religion and Human Rights, the Phenomenology of Conversion, Globalization in Religion, and Public Theology.

 

Dr. Charles T. Phillips is the CEO/President of Service For Peace, which implements community based learning in courses on advocacy, leadership and social justice. Dr. Phillips is fluent in Russian and holds a Ph.D. in sociology from Moscow State University. He is the Chairperson for the Martin Luther King Jr. Service Learning and Diversity Education Initiative at the University of Bridgeport.

 

Dr. Noel Brown is President of Friends of the United Nations. Previously, he served as the Director of the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP), North American regional office. Dr. Brown holds a B.A. in Political Science and Economics from Seattle University, an M.A. in International Law and Organization from Georgetown University, and a Ph.D. in International Law and Relations from Yale University.

 

Alumni and Students

Students and Alumni from the Criminal Justice track include:

Officer Jean Gaie, a 2007 graduate, is a member of the Bridgeport Police Force. Following his graduation from the University of Bridgeport, he went on to graduate study at the Henry C. Lee College of Criminal Justice and Forensic Sciences with a focus on Homeland Security.
Tom Jones is a 2007 graduate of the program and is currently working in one of the Federal Security Agencies.

Tricia Lee is a 2008 graduate of the program and was accepted for graduate study at both John Jay and Henry C. Lee College of Criminal Justice and Forensic Sciences where she is pursuing her Masters.

Careers that students pursue after graduating from this major include:

  • Law Enforcement
  • Government
  • Customs
  • Social Work
  • Investigation
  • Teaching
  • Community Service
  • Counseling
  • Education
  • Public Administration

Co-Curricular Activities

In addition to the classes, there are co- and extra- curricular activities relevant to the interests of those in the major. Presentations, debates, forums and a tour has been sponsored by the College of Public and International Affairs to further studies outside the classroom setting.

  • International Awareness Club
  • Debates on Foreign Policy
  • Zuhair Suidan: Will there ever be peace between Israel and Palestine?
  • Tong-Il Moo Do Club
  • Internships
  • Taekwondo Club
  • Jujitsu Club
  • 2004 Masters Cup International Taekwondo Championship