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Curriculum 


 

While pursuing your Master of Arts in Criminal Justice and Human Security degree, you will be required to take 21 semester hours of core courses and 15 semester hours of electives.


 

Program Core Requirements (with Concentrations)

These courses are specific to the Master of Arts in Criminal Justice and Human Security degree program.

CJHS 501 Criminal Justice Research Methods
CJHS 511 Human Security and Approaches to Justice
CJHS 530 US Law and Criminal Justice
CJHS 532 Law Enforcement Management
CJHS 591 Internship
CJHS 598 CJHS Capstone
CJHS 599A Thesis or CJHS 599B Project Demonstrating Competence

Elective Courses

Select five electives that appeal to your area of interest.

CJHS 522 International Conflict and Negotiation
CJHS 535 Theories on Crimes, Norms, and Deviance (comparative across major cultural spheres & historically)
CJHS 540 International Criminal Law
CJHS 550 Comparative Criminal Procedures
CJHS 559 Cybercrime and Cyberterrorism
CJHS 560 Transnational Crime—Drugs, Human Trafficking, Arms Shipment
CJHS 578 Topics in Criminal Justice Policy

 

Keys to Completing the Criminal Justice and Human Security (M.A.) Degree Program


The Master of Arts in Criminal Justice and Human Security degree program requires successful completion of 36 semester-hours of required coursework broken into 21 semester-hours (or seven courses) of core material, and 15 semester-hours (or five courses) of electives. This includes completion of the following three Capstone projects: CJHS 591 Internship; CJHS 598 CJHS Capstone; and CJHS 599 (a Thesis or a Project Demonstrating Competency (PDC)). The program will require two years for completion.

 

In addition to required coursework, students will be expected to:

  • develop written and oral communication skills as well as intercultural literacy and critical thinking skills through the course offerings and Capstone experiences
  • develop specific skills in addressing the international dimensions of crime
  • complete an internship with an appropriate law enforcement or other approved agency
  • demonstrate a basic working knowledge of a foreign language equivalent to two years of University-level foreign language study