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Sen. Richard Blumenthal to launch “Don’t Let Your Life Go Up in Smoke” program for Fairfield County teenagers at the University of Bridgeport on Wednesday, August 10

Tuesday, August 09, 2011

Media contact:    Leslie Geary, Director of Public Information,
University of Bridgeport, (203) 993-0380
 
Where: Dana Hall, Room 129
University of Bridgeport
169 University Avenue
 
Who: Senator Richard Blumenthal, D-CT
Mary-Jane Foster, Vice President Community Relations,
University of Bridgeport
Meredith Ferraro, Executive Director, Connecticut Area Health Education Center (AHEC)
Dawn Mays-Hardy, Connecticut Director, American Lung Association
 
What: “Don’t Let Your Life Go Up In Smoke”
 

Sen. Blumenthal will deliver opening remarks for Don’t Let Your Life Go Up in Smoke, a weeklong antismoking and youth training program that prepares high school students to advocate against tobacco use and prepares them for jobs in health care. Teenagers will learn about health-science careers and the effects of and science behind smoking from expert professors from the University of Bridgeport Division of Health Sciences and biology program. Participants in the program will then participate as mentors in the Teens Against Tobacco Use, an anti-tobacco program geared to middle school students that launches in Fairfield County schools in September 2011.

Don’t Let Your Life Go Up in Smoke is funded by that Connecticut Department of Health Tobacco Control Program through the American Lung Association.

 
Statistics:

Smoking is the cause of one in five deaths annually in the U.S. and kills 443.000 individuals per year. (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

The number of American teenagers who smoke casually (between six and 10 cigarettes a day) increased from 67 percent to 79 percent between 1991 and 2009. (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

There are more than 4,000 chemicals in cigarettes and 43 of those are carcinogens, chemicals that cause cancer. (American Lung Association)