Employment Outlook

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that “Clinical laboratory technologists and technicians held about 319,000 jobs in 2006” and that “Employment of clinical laboratory workers is expected to grow 14 percent between 2006 and 2016, faster than the average for all occupations. The volume of laboratory tests continues to increase with both population growth and the development of new types of tests.”

There is an acute workforce shortage in Medical Technology in the state of Connecticut and the nation. The University has secured commitment from a regional hospital to serve as a clinical site for students in the program.

In a December 2007 article entitled, “ASCP Teams Up With State Pathology Society to Address the Workforce Shortage” the American Society for Clinical Pathology argued,

The statistics are alarming: the profession needs 15,000 new practitioners per year, yet education programs graduate approximately 5,000 students per year. Declining interest in laboratory medicine as a career over the past two decades has led to training program closures. As a result, the number of NAACLS accredited medical technology programs dropped from 709 in 1975 to 222 in 2007.

The article further argued that “it is clear that new training programs must be established if we are to meet the future demand for laboratory personnel.” In Connecticut, recent BLS data shows that 2,310 Medical Technologists work 0.137% of the overall workforce with an average mean wage of $59,090 per year. Based on its dialogue with students in pre-health science major programs, the University is confident that there is strong student interest in this program.