Finance (M.S.)

Immerse yourself in our rich curriculum

Our Finance (M.S.) degree program is designed with a particular course sequence in mind, allowing you to seamlessly progress from broad surveys and overviews of financial core topics to granular details relevant to particular financial sectors. You will continue to build upon your knowledge in areas such as investment analysis, financial modeling, derivatives valuation, international finance, behavioral finance, financial management, investment banking, and managerial economics. To culminate your studies, you will complete either an industry-focused capstone with an internship, or a research-focused capstone with a thesis, which is suggested if you are considering a terminal degree.

The curriculum is designed to recognize and accommodate substantial diversity in preparation and experience as well as the different goals and career expectations of students. For this reason, you may be required to complete preparatory coursework to successfully graduate from the 30-credit program. Flexible course delivery enables you to proceed at your desired pace. Most students can complete the Finance (M.S.) degree program in 18 to 24 months.

Course Descriptions

Preparatory Courses: Acquiring the Foundation for Success (up to 12 Credits)

If you are a student with undergraduate preparation in a non-business field, you may be required to complete up to 12 credits of preparatory coursework. If you have a strong academic record (“B” or better in each case) from an accredited university, you may be able to waive preparatory foundation courses. Accounting and Business Law (ACCT 500) requires financial accounting, as well as any course labelled business law that included contracts and tort law. Economics and Finance (ECON 500) requires both micro- and macro- economics, as well as finance that included time value of money. Information Systems and Quantitative Methods (ITKM 500) requires information systems, intermediate Excel, and either MS Excel- or SAS-based statistics or research methods. Management and Marketing (MGMT 500) requires organizational behavior, operations management, and marketing or any similarly named course that includes consumer behavior.

This coursework provides the basic fundamentals across the business disciplines that serve as a necessary foundation for the Finance (M.S.) degree program.

Program Core Requirements

These courses are specific to the Master of Science in Finance degree program. These courses include program concentrations.

This course provides a general survey of the body of knowledge of corporate finance. Corporate finance is an area of finance dealing with the financial decisions corporations make and the tools and analyses used to make these decisions. The primary goal of corporate finance is to enhance corporate value and shareholder’s wealth. To achieve this goal, financial managers must make important decisions such as project evaluations and investment decisions, financing decisions and dividend decisions. A solid understanding of the financial markets is also essential. The main concepts and principles in the study of corporate finance are also applicable to the financial problems of all kinds of firms. Basic accounting and statistics are essential to understanding the principles developed in this course.
Credits: 3

This course provides a framework for the analysis of individual securities such as stocks, bonds and other financial instruments. It develops a systematic framework for the construction of efficient portfolios and optimal investment strategies. It also discusses the investment environment, including the financial markets and major financial institutions, the Federal Reserve, and the determination of interest rates. Various investment strategies used by practitioners are also discussed.
Credits: 3

This is an introductory course on international financial management, with special emphasis on multinational enterprises (MNEs). An MNE is defined broadly as one that is incorporated in one country but has operating subsidiaries, branches or affiliates located in other countries. Today, almost all large companies are multinational, with the 1,000 largest MNEs accounting for about 80% of the world’s industrial production. Main topics to be covered in this course include the foreign exchange market, exchange rate determination, foreign exchange risk management, and global debt and equity financing. The global financial environment such as the international monetary system and the balance of payments will also be discussed.
Credits: 3

This course covers financial derivatives such as forward contracts, futures contracts, options and swaps. A derivative is a financial instrument that is derived from the value of an underlying asset, which may include commodities, equities, bonds, foreign exchange, or indices such as a stock market index, consumer price index or even an index of weather conditions. These derivatives can not only be used for speculation and arbitrage, but more importantly, for risk management. Students will develop a working knowledge of how these derivatives are used and priced.
Credits: 3

Traditional financial and economic theory assumes investors exhibit a nearly perfect level of rationality. This course explores the truth of this assumption in various contexts, as well as the implications for businesses, organizations, governments, and markets. The course fosters a skeptical approach to both traditional and behavioral results and an independent approach to thinking so that the students are able to enhance not only their appreciation of behavioralism in others but also in their own individual decision making. The essence of the course explores what opportunities are created by systematic deviations from rationality, and questions how they can be either exploited or mitigated.
Credits: 3

This course introduces important financial models and shows how they can be solved numerically and/or simulated using computer technology (e.g.  using Microsoft Excel). This class covers standard financial models in the areas of corporate finance, financial statement simulation, accounting model, portfolio problems, options, portfolio insurance, duration, and immunization. It will give tools for understanding the computational intricacies in finance. Too often, finance courses stop short of making a connection between textbook finance and the problems of real-world business. This course bridges this gap between theory and practice by providing a nuts-and-bolts guide to solving common financial and accounting models with spreadsheets.
Credits: 3

This course covers financial derivatives such as forward contracts, futures contracts, options and swaps. A derivative is a financial instrument that is derived from the value of an underlying asset. The underlying asset can be commodities, equities, bonds, foreign exchange, or indices such as a stock market index, consumer price index or even an index of weather conditions. These derivatives can not only be used for speculation and arbitrage, but more importantly, can also be used for risk management. Students will develop a working knowledge of how these derivatives are used and how they are priced.
Credits: 3

This course will explore various issues of creating, storing, sharing and applying knowledge in organizational environment. The course introduces guiding theories and concepts of knowledge management and examines various tools used in the processes. Then the course also explores business and management topics in knowledge management, including general issues in evaluating informal systems like knowledge management systems and the relationship of knowledge management to the work, etc.
Credits: 3

This course will provide an in depth understanding of sophisticated business analytics methods and their application in varied business contexts.
Credits: 3

Capstone Options

Students will select one option based upon their professional and academic goals. Students interested in pursuing terminal degrees are more likely to pursue a thesis.

This is an introductory course in qualitative and quantitative research methods. It is designed to introduce you to basic concepts and issues (statistical, analytical, and ethical) encountered in research investigation. We will discuss what research is, the tools of research, research design, and writing the research report. Included will be an introduction to a diversity of research methods, including survey, historical research, experimental methods, content analysis, and so forth. An overview of statistical means of data interpretation also will be presented, including correlation, ttests, ANOVA, ChiSquare Test, Sign Test, regression analysis, and so forth.
Credits: 3

The capstone experience provides the final integration of student learning across the disciplines and the application of concepts learned to practical and competitive situations.
Credits: 3