Acupuncture Practice and Techniques (APT)

The nine (9) acupuncture courses introduce students to the theoretical and practical information of acupuncture therapy. The student becomes proficient in the clinical applications of acupuncture, moxabustion, cupping, electrical stimulation, and bleeding techniques. The student learns to identify acupuncture points by anatomical location, palpation, and proportional measurement. The classification, function and indications for each acupuncture point are discussed and demonstrated. In addition to the twelve bilateral channels, two midline vessels and six other extra meridians, forbidden and contraindication of points are discussed. In addition, extra points, auricular points and other categories of acupuncture points are demonstrated and treatment techniques based on these extra meridians and points are discussed and practiced.

APT 511 Point Location 1.
This course will serve as the foundation of the acupuncture point selection series. Meridian theory using concepts of the Jing Luo system, including main and secondary vessels will be reinforced. This course provides the student with the knowledge and skills to physically locate acupuncture points of the lung, large intestine, stomach and spleen, heart and small intestine, urinary bladder, kidney, and pericardium channels. Students will focus on how to locate points effectively, accurately, and quickly as preparation for clinical application as well as college and national examinations. Students will also learn the major function(s) and indication(s) of the Lung, Large Intestine, Stomach, Spleen, Heart, Small Intestine, Urinary Bladder, Kidney and Pericardium channel points. Co-requisite/Prerequisite: ATD 513 Oriental Diagnosis 1, ABS 511 Anatomy 1. 1.5 lecture hours, 1 laboratory hour, 2 semester credits.

APT 523 Point Location II.
This is a continuation of the previous course and will focus on the Triple Warmer, Gall Bladder, Liver, Governing Vessel (“Du”), Conception Vessel (“Ren”) and extra points. Additional instruction is given in regional point selection and point combinations. Prerequisites: ATD 513 Oriental Diagnosis 1, ABS 511 Anatomy 1. 1.5 lecture hours, 1 laboratory hour, 2 semester credits.

APT 512 Meridian Theory.
Meridian (a.k.a. Channel) theory is the basis of diagnosis and acupuncture treatment. This course is designed to provide the necessary instruction and training for the student to be familiar with meridian theory including regular, extra and other meridian systems. Corequisite/Prerequisites: ATD 512 Oriental Theory and ATD 513 Oriental Diagnosis 1. 2 lecture hours, 2 semester credits.

AWB 521 Clean Needle Technique.
This course prepares the student for emergency situations both in and out of the office. CCAOM Clean Needle Technique and a review of Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standards are presented. In addition the student will practice safe and proper needling, moxabustion, electrical stimulation and cupping techniques. Allopathic treatments along with natural remedies for common complications of acupuncture and related therapies are discussed. CPR certification in emergency procedures is achieved. Prerequisites: none. 2 lecture hours, 2 semester credits.

APT 614 Acupuncture Techniques I.
This course covers the basic principles of acupuncture treatment for diseases involved with different pathogenic factors, tissues and organs. Special point selection based on Root-Branch, Origin-End, Path of Qi, Five Element and Eight Parameter diagnoses are covered. Indications and contraindications of moxibustion, scalp acupuncture and electrical acupuncture stimulation are covered. Prerequisites: APT 511 and APT 523: Point Location I and II. 2 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours, 3 semester credits.

APT 625 Acupuncture Techniques II.
This course covers functions, indications and needling methods of the Well, Spring, Stream, River, Sea, Source, Luo, Xicleft, Back Shu, Front Mu and Lower He-Sea, Eight Influential, Eight Confluent and important crossing points. Continuing practice in needling, moxibustion and cupping techniques is included. In addition, the prevention and treatment of acupuncture complications is covered. Prerequisite: APT 614 Techniques I. 2 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours, 3 semester credits.

APT 626: Auricular & Scalp Acupuncture.
This course introduces the student to various forms of microsystem acupuncture, focusing on auricular and scalp systems. The student learns the respective maps of the scalp and ear, clinical applications and treatment strategies. Corequisite/Prerequisite: APT 614 Acupuncture Techniques I, 1 lecture hour, 1 semester credit.

APT 718: Pediatric Acupuncture.
The special diagnostic and treatment skills required for the treatment of patients less than 12 years of age are discussed. The balance of safety for the patient and treatment efficacy is emphasized. Prerequisite: APT 625 Acupuncture Techniques II. 1 lecture hour, 1 semester credit.

APT 637: Japanese Acupuncture Techniques.
This course covers the unique treatment strategies and protocols developed by Japanese acupuncture masters. Prerequisite: APT 614 Acupuncture Techniques I. 1 lecture hour, 1 semester credit.

Asian Medicine Theory, Diagnosis and Application (ATD)

The thirteen (13) Asian medicine theory and diagnosis courses are designed to provide the student with an understanding of the scope, philosophy, theory and conceptual frame work of oriental medicine and how acupuncture specifically affects the body within the oriental treatment paradigms. Emphasis is placed on Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) diagnoses and effective treatment strategies.

ATD 511: TCM History and Philosophy.
The student studies the different eras of Chinese history and the effects on Traditional Chinese Medicine theories. This course includes the study of the development of Naturalism, Philosophical and Religious Taoism, Confucianism, and Buddhism and their contributions to Chinese Medicine. For each philosophy, the course examines how the philosophy views the human relationship to nature, and the human relationship to the universe. In addition, the impact of philosophy and religion on the traditional Chinese medical paradigm is explored. Prerequisite: none. 1 lecture hour, 0 laboratory hours, 1 semester credit.

ATD 512: TCM Medical Theory.
This course includes the classic theories of yin and yang and the Five phases that are fundamental to understanding the Oriental medical relationship between humans and the universe. Normal physiology is studied through the fundamental substances (Qi, Blood, Essence, Spirit and bodily fluids), and organs. The basic theory of illness and diagnosis using four examinations (sight, listening and smelling, palpation, and asking) and Eight parameters are covered. Prerequisites: Anatomy and Physiology. 2 lecture hours, 2 semester credits.

ATD 513: TCM Diagnosis I.
The basic theory and characteristics of the pathogenesis and pathogenic factors are covered including the seven emotions, disharmony of Yin and Yang, abnormalities in Qi, Blood, Spirit, Essence and Bodily fluids, and organ disharmonies are covered. Techniques in inquiry, palpation, tongue and pulse diagnosis are covered. Diagnoses incorporating the eight parameters as well as root and stem concepts are covered for each of the twelve zang-fu. Prerequisite/Co-requisite: ADT 512 Oriental Medical Theory. 2 lecture hours, 2 semester credits.

ATD 524: TCM Diagnosis II.
This course will provide the student with further understanding of Traditional Chinese Medicine diagnosis, expanding on concepts from TCM Diagnosis I. Traditional Chinese Medicine organ diagnoses, eight principle and febrile disease diagnoses will be stressed. In addition, treatment principles and acupuncture treatments based on these diagnostic systems will be explored. Differential diagnoses of common disease entities will be explored. Students will also continue to practice pulse and tongue diagnosis. Prerequisite: ADT 513 TCM Diagnosis 1. 2 lecture hours, 2 semester credits.

ATD 515 Seminar 1.
This course will help the student to negotiate their first year in the Acupuncture program. The student will be guided through overviews of Chinese Medicine as preparation for integrating material from the entire curriculum. The student will review and update Chinese Medical terminology as well as the range of resources and the different perspectives on this terminology and the concepts contained therein. Diagnostic practical skills such as pulse and tongue diagnosis will be reviewed in a practical group setting. In addition the student will apply concepts of information literacy and its use case studies. Prerequisites: none. 1.5 lecture hours, 1.5 semester credits

ATD 529 Seminar 2.
This course will be a continuation of seminar one. The student will be guided through the application and integration of concepts and skills acquired in the first and second semester curricula. The student will apply these through the use of case studies and clinical examples. The basics of applying diagnosis and generation of treatment principles will be reinforced in a collegial setting. Group activities such as case analysis, pulse and tongue analysis and grand rounds will also be reviewed with a deepening understanding of clinical applications of such. Prerequisites: ATD 515. 1.5 lecture hours, 1.5 semester credits

ATD 618 Seminar 3.
This course will help the student gain a deeper understanding of case study skills necessary to become an AOM clinical practitioner. The student will be guided through case study, case analysis and pattern differentiation as utilized in clinical practice as preparation for integrating material from the entire curriculum into the clinical setting. Case presentations and clinical skills utilizing a problem based learning format using TCM principles and evidence-informed clinical practice skills are emphasized. The foci of the case studies for this course are on mental/emotional disorders, patterns associated with emotional disorders, and the impact of emotional issues in the acupuncture clinic. In addition, the student will gain a basic understanding of the ethical and counseling issues surrounding licensed practice in the field of Traditional Chinese Medicine. Prerequisites: ATD 529. 1.5 lecture hours, 1.5 semester credits.

ATD 711: East-West Pathology.
This course compares and contrasts diagnosis and treatment between Western and Oriental diagnoses. Western medical diagnosis of these diseases is incorporated so that the student is able to collaborate with western physicians. Major and common categories of diseases including respiratory tract, infectious, gastrointestinal, genitourinary and musculoskeletal diseases are covered. Prerequisite: ADT 513 Oriental Diagnosis I. 2 lecture hours, 2 semester credits.

ATD 715: Oriental Internal Medicine.
This course focuses on the diagnosis and oriental treatment of major illness. Treatment planning includes acupuncture, qi gong, and massage. Diagnoses cover respiratory illnesses, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, gynecological, and psychological illnesses. Root-stem. Meridian, Substance and 5 Element treatments are included. Prerequisite: ATD 513 Oriental Diagnosis I. 2 lecture hours, 2 semester credits.

ATD 717: Advanced Tongue and Pulse Diagnosis.
This course is designed to increase the diagnostic skills and clinical applications of these uniquely oriental diagnostic parameters. The student studies healthy and diseased tongues and pulses and discusses how findings in these areas change the treatment principles and strategies. Case studies from the clinical rotations are used to increase both depth and breadth of skill. Prerequisite: ADT 524: Oriental Diagnosis II. 1 lecture hour, 1 semester credit.

ATD 727: Case Studies 1
The student will be guided through case study, case analysis and pattern differentiation as utilized in clinical practice as preparation for integrating material from the entire curriculum into the clinical setting. Case presentations and clinical skills are emphasized through a problem based learning format using TCM principles as the foundation. Emphasis for this class is on cases associated with problems of fluid dynamics and chronic pain, which are frequent chief complaints in the AOM clinical setting. Prerequisite: ATD 529 Seminar 2. 1 lecture hour, 1 semester credit.

ATD 728: Case Study Organization and Applications.
Students learn to transition from the development of pattern diagnosis to TCM treatment principles which then lead to point and modality applications. Emphasis is placed on an accurate assignment of symptoms to pattern diagnosis; logical treatment principles reflecting the priorities and totality of the patterns diagnosis; and the most efficacious acupuncture point and adjunctive modality prescriptions to help the patient achieve health. Prerequisite: ATD 529 Seminar 2. 1 lecture hour, 1 semester credit.

ATD 729: Acupuncture Gynecology.
This course is designed to familiarize the student with oriental diagnosis and acupuncture treatments of common gynecologic conditions. Special emphasis is placed on understanding those points forbidden to needle or moxa in cases where the patient’s pregnancy status is unknown. Prerequisite: ADT 524: Oriental Diagnosis II. 1 lecture hour, 1 semester credit.

ATD 742 TCM Geriatrics
This course is designed to familiarize the student with TCM diagnosis and acupuncture treatments that apply to elderly patients. Special emphasis is placed on understanding the physiological changes that affect the health of the elderly from both a TCM and biomedical perspective. Prerequisite: ATD 715: TCM Internal Medicine. 1 lecture hour, 1 semester credit.

Western Biomedicine (AWB)

The sixteen (16) biomedical courses are designed to train the student fully about biomedical terms, history taking, physical exam and laboratory diagnostic skills. The student learns how to make the appropriate referral and consultation, as well as the clinical relevance of laboratory and diagnostic tests and procedures.

ABS 511: Anatomy 1.
This course provides an in-depth study of the macroscopic human anatomy and covers the structure of the trunk and neck regions. Clinical aspects of the vascular and neurological relationships of these regions are emphasized. Instruction includes lectures and interactive media software. Prerequisite: none. 4 lecture hours, 4 semester credits.

ABS 522: Anatomy 2.
This course is a continuation of Anatomy 1 and covers the structure of the head and extremities. Clinical aspects of the neurological and vascular relationships of these regions is emphasized. Prerequisite: ABS 511 Anatomy 1. 4 lecture hours, 4 semester credits.

ABS 515: Physiology 1.
This course emphasizes the function of cellular structures which regulate homeostasis as well as their role in cell division and genetic control of protein synthesis. Emphasis is placed on the role of the cell membrane in the control of cellular events. The effects of physiology on hormones, their role in homeostasis, and the functional changes associated with homeostasis are considered. Prerequisite: none. 2 lecture hours, 2 semester credits.

ABS 525: Physiology 2.
This course is a study of physiology at the organ and systems level. Included is the study of the circulatory, respiratory, renal, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal and urogenital systems. Also included is the study of the endocrine system and its interrelationships with various organs and systems. There is an integration of normal physiology with pathophysiology and clinical concepts. Prerequisite: ABS 515. 2 lecture hours, 2 semester credits.

AWB 523 Pharmacology.
This course examines the most commonly used pharmacologic agents to be encountered in the clinical setting. The general principles of pharmacology (pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics) are covered. Uses and side effects of antibiotics, anti-inflammatory agents, hormones and cardiac drugs are surveyed. Drug-nutrient and drug-herb interactions are discussed. Prerequisite: none. 1 lecture hour, 1 semester credit.

AWB 621 Medical Ethics.
This course is designed to provide the student with a basic understanding of the ethical issues surrounding practice in any medical field. Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to identify concepts of medical and professional ethics as they apply to the practice of health care. 1 lecture credit, 1 semester credit. Prerequisites: none

ACS 511 Evidence Informed Practices
The basic principles of clinical and laboratory research are examined with a special emphasis on the applications of acupuncture and oriental techniques in the research setting. Application of research to case evaluation will be emphasized. 1 lecture credit, 1 semester credit. Prerequisites: none

ACS 611: Pathology 1.
This course is a study of the pathophysiological process and how this process alters the gross, microscopic and clinical manifestations of disease. Basic pathological processes of inflammation, repair, degeneration, necrosis, immunology and neoplasia are presented. Prerequisite: ABS 525 Physiology 2. 2 lecture hours, 2 semester credits.

ACS 624: Pathology 2.
This course is the continuation of the pathological processes of various diseases. This course emphasizes the basis of systemic diseases of the cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, urogenital, endocrine, hepatobiliary, renal and pancreatic systems. Prerequisite: ACS 611 Pathology 1. 4 lecture hours, 4 semester credits.

ACS 612: Clinical Diagnosis 1.
This course covers the techniques used for physical examination for various systems of the body. Skills taught develop an appreciation for normal variations and abnormalities associated with disease states. The student is taught to recognize the signs and symptoms of common diseases. Prerequisites: ABS 511, ABS 521, ABS 515, ABS 252. 3 Lecture hours, 2 lab hours, 4 semester credits.

ACS 623: Clinical Diagnosis 2.
This course is a continuation of Clinical Diagnosis 1. Prerequisite: ACS 612. 3 lecture hours, 2 lab hours, 4 semester credits.

ACS 724: Public Health.
This course covers current environmental and public health concerns with an emphasis on the role of the acupuncturist in these issues. The course integrates health with diet, water and air pollutants, noise and substance abuse. Recognition of major communicable diseases is included. Prerequisite: ABS 525 Pathology 2. 2 lecture hours, 2 semester credits.

ACS 613: Lab Diagnosis.
This course introduces the student to the appropriate use and interpretation of laboratory tests. Prerequisites: ABS 521 and ABS 525. 2 lecture hours, 2 semester credits.

ANT 521: Nutrition.
This course provides the foundation for therapeutic nutrition. It explores the biochemistry of macronutrients as well as vitamins and minerals. Deficiencies, toxicities, therapeutic uses and appropriate doses are examined. An assessment of dietary needs and the application of therapeutic nutrition in treating individual diseases and syndromes are also taught. Prerequisites: none. 3 lecture hours, 3 semester credits.

ACS 712 Diagnostic Imaging.
This course covers radiographic anatomy and diagnostic imaging techniques. A basic introduction to imaging, including roentgenology, computerized tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound, and bone scanning are discussed. The basic concepts of these techniques and their use in diagnosis are discussed. Prerequisites: Anatomy 2, Physiology 2.

ACS 625: Physical Exam Skills.
This course helps students develop the skills necessary to conduct screening physical exams and specialty exams useful in the ambulatory practice. The student will learn the appropriate exam and physical diagnostic procedures that correspond with the patient’s chief complaint and medical history. Clinical decision making and identification of clinical red flags are emphasized. Physical examination skills: Cardio, Chest/Pulmonary, Abdomen/GI, Neuro, General screening exam, physical exam of the spine, physical exam of the major joints (shoulder, elbow, hip, knee, foot). Prerequisites: Clinical Dx 1.

ACS 626: Laboratory Diagnosis 2: Nutritional and functional analyses.
This course will educate the student on nutritional assessment to include health, diet and lifestyle history, physical measurements, and laboratory testing to include analysis of blood, stool, saliva and urine. The course will integrate use of these measurements in the design of an appropriate nutritional protocol for the client. The student will also learn effective client management and follow-up. Prerequisites: Clinical Dx 1, Lab Dx 1.

AWB 725 Pharmacology 2.
This course builds on the basic information in Pharmacology 1 to expand the student’s understanding of pharmacology, including mechanisms of action; absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics); interactions with other drugs and with herbs/food; problems with special populations (prenatal, neonatal, elderly); rational drug usage for clinical disorders (therapeutics): clinical effects of drugs (by category); and toxicology.

ACH: Asian/Chinese Herbology

The ten (10) courses in Chinese Herbology offer the student a thorough understanding of Chinese Materia Medica, Classical and Patent formulas and modifications, and the clinical application of Chinese herbs and formulae. The student becomes proficient in the theories pertinent to Chinese Herbal Medicine and the clinical applications of Chinese materia medica for a wide variety of clinical situations and patient populations. At the completion of the 10 course survey, students will have learned over 300 individual herbs and over 150 different classical and patent formulae.

ACH 511 Chinese Formulae for Channel Obstruction Syndromes.
This course will indicate Chinese Herbal Formulae for commonly encountered bi syndromes and channel obstruction syndromes (pain syndromes). This course will examine in detail at least 20 different TCM formulae and 35 different individual herbs in the TCM materia medica. In the course of this presentation: a) an explanation of the Traditional Chinese Medicine pathomechanism for various pain complaints associated with bi syndromes and channel obstruction syndromes will be provided, b) the mechanisms through which the Chief, Deputy, Assistant & Envoy Herbs within the formula treat based on treatment principles will be provided c) possible interactions and contraindications between commonly utilized drugs for obstruction syndromes & Chinese Herbal Formulae will be provided, d) Summaries of the most up-to-date and significant evidence-based research on both Chinese Herbal Patent Remedies & conventional care will be examined. 2 lecture credits, 36 hours. Prerequisites:

ACH 512 Chinese Herb Formulae for Common Ailments.
This course will cover frequently prescribed Chinese Herbal Formulae for the ten most commonly encountered diseases in a TCM ambulatory practice. At least 20 formulae and 35 discrete herbs will be covered in depth. In the course of this presentation: a) an explanation of the Traditional Chinese Medicine pathomechanism for discrete diseases will be provided; b) the mechanisms through which the Chief, Deputy, Assistant & Envoy Herbs within the formula treat the disease will be provided; c) possible interactions and contraindications between conventional/drug treatments & Chinese Herbal Patent Formulae will be provided; and d) Summaries of the most up-to-date and significant evidence-based research on both Chinese Herbal formulae & conventional care will be examined. 2 lecture credits, 36 hours. Prerequisites: ATD 524: TCM Diagnosis II

ACH 523 Chinese Herbal Theories and Triple Burner Theories.
This course will describe and analyze the twenty major categories that Chinese Herbal Formulae are categorized into for the Qi, Blood & Body Fluids, Zang-Fu & Channel Theory Paradigms in the modern TCM Materia Medica. Within these categories, the fundamental treatment strategies that these formulae employ, the role that individual herbs within the formulae play to accomplish the treatment strategy and the accessibility of patent formulas for these formulae will be explored. At least 20 herbal formulae and 35 different herbs will be explored in depth including: a) an explanation of the Traditional Chinese Medicine pathomechanism for various complaints will be provided, b) the mechanisms through which the Chief, Deputy, Assistant & Envoy Herbs within the formula treat based on treatment principles will be provided c) possible interactions and contraindications between commonly utilized drugs for obstruction syndromes & Chinese Herbal Formulae will be provided, d) Summaries of the most up-to-date and significant evidence-based research on both Chinese Herbal Patent Remedies & conventional care will be examined.. Additional description, analysis, and application will be included for the San Jiao diagnostic paradigm. 1.5 lecture credits, 27 hours. Prerequisites: ACH 512

ACH 524 Chinese Herbs for Exogenous Disease Patterns.
This Chinese Herbal Formulae course will address Exogenous disease including San Jiao, 6 Channel (Shang Han Lun), and 4 portion (Wen Bing) diseases. At least 20 herbal formulae and 35 different herbs will be explored in depth including: a) an explanation of the Traditional Chinese Medicine pathomechanism for various complaints will be provided, b) the mechanisms through which the Chief, Deputy, Assistant & Envoy Herbs within the formula treat based on treatment principles will be provided c) possible interactions and contraindications between commonly utilized drugs for obstruction syndromes & Chinese Herbal Formulae will be provided, d) Summaries of the most up-to-date and significant evidence-based research on both Chinese Herbal Patent Remedies & conventional care will be examined.. 2.5 lecture credits, 45 hours. Prerequisites: ACH 512

ACH 634 Clinical Application of Herbs 1.
This course will amplify and reiterate content from ACH 511, ACH 512, ACH 523 and ACH 524.. The student will explore the traditional Chinese Medicine Materia Medica in depth and learn to discriminate between herb categories, their general applications and associated Treatment Principles and individual, unique applications, signs and symptoms. The student will explore at least 100 herbs including reiterating and amplifying content from the previous courses. This course will focus on Herbs that Release the Exterior, Herbs that Clear Heat, Downward Draining Herbs, Herbs that Drain Dampness and Herbs that Dispel Wind-Dampness. This course will serve as partial basis for the following formulae courses. 2 lecture credits, 36 hours. Prerequisites: ACH 511, ACH 512, ACH 523

ACH 636 Chinese Formulae I.
This course will be a continuation and amplification of the previous herbal curriculum (ACH 511, ACH 512, ACH 523, ACH 524) with an emphasis on herbal formulae. The student will explore at least 80 formulae including reiterating and expanding content from previous courses. This course will focus on Formulae that Release the exterior, Clear Heat, Harmonize, Moisten Dryness, Clear Damp Heat, Transform and Leach Dampness, and Dispel Wind-Dampness. The student will learn the name, actions, indications, cautions and contraindications of the classical base formulae according to the traditional categorization based on treatment principles. In addition the student will explore the traditional structure of herbal formulae as a prelude to formula modification (general, assistant, etc.). 2 lecture credits, 36 hours. Prerequisites: ACH 511, ACH 512, ACH 523, ACH 524

ACH 617 Clinical Application of Herbs 2.
This course will amplify and reiterate content from ACH 511, ACH 512, ACH 523 and ACH 524. The student will explore the traditional Chinese Medicine Materia Medica in depth and learn to discriminate between herb categories, their general applications and associated Treatment Principles and individual, unique applications, signs and symptoms. The student will explore at least 100 herbs including reiterating and amplifying content from the previous courses. This course will focus on Herbs that Transform Phlegm and Stop Coughing, Herbs that Relieve Food Stagnation, Herbs that Regulate Qi, Herbs that Regulate the Blood, and Herbs that Invigorate the Blood. This course will serve as partial basis for the formulae courses. 2 lecture credits, 36 hours. Prerequisites: ACH 635

ACH 628 Clinical Application of Herbs 3.
This course will amplify and reiterate content from ACH 511, ACH 512, ACH 523 and ACH 524. The student will explore the traditional Chinese Medicine Materia Medica in depth and learn to discriminate between herb categories, their general applications and associated Treatment Principles and individual, unique applications, signs and symptoms. The student will explore at least 100 herbs including reiterating and amplifying content from the previous courses. This course will focus on Herbs that Warm the Interior and Expel Cold, Herbs that Tonify the Qi, Herbs that Tonify the Blood, Herbs that Tonify the Yang, Herbs that Tonify the Yin, Herbs that Stabilize and Bind, Substances that Anchor, Settle and Calm the Spirit, Aromatic Substances that Open the Orifices, Substances that Extinguish Wind and Stop Tremors, Herbs that Expel Parasites and Substances for External Application. This course will serve as partial basis for the formulae courses. 2 lecture credits, 36 hours. Prerequisites: ACH 617

ACH 619 Chinese Formulae 2.
This course will be a continuation and amplification of the previous herbal curriculum (ACH 511, ACH 512, ACH 523, ACH 524) with an emphasis on herbal formulae. The student will explore at least 80 formulae including reiterating and expanding content from previous courses. This course will focus on Formulae that Warm and Disperse Cold, Promote the Movement of Qi, Invigorate Blood, Clear Heat and Stop Bleeding, Transform Phlegm and Reduce Food Stagnation. The student will learn the name, actions, indications, cautions and contraindications of the classical base formulae according to the traditional categorization based on treatment principles. In addition the student will explore the traditional structure of herbal formulae as a prelude to formula modification (general, assistant, etc.). 2 lecture credits, 36 hours. Prerequisites: ACH 636

ACH 641 Chinese Formulae 3.
This course will be a continuation and amplification of the previous herbal curriculum (ACH 511, ACH 512, ACH 523, ACH 524) with an emphasis on herbal formulae. The student will explore at least 80 formulae including reiterating and expanding content from previous courses. This course will focus on Formulae that Tonify, Stabilize and Bind, Nourish the Heart and Calm the Shen, Open the Orifices and expel Parasites. The student will learn the name, actions, indications, cautions and contraindications of the classical base formulae according to the traditional categorization based on treatment principles. In addition the student will explore the traditional structure of herbal formulae as a prelude to formula modification (general, assistant, etc.) External formulae for pain syndromes will be addressed as well as special preparation (“pao-zhi”). 2 lecture credits, 36 hours. Prerequisites: ACH 619

Herbal Medicine Survey (AHM)

The four (5) courses in herbal medicine and dietetics give the student a basic introduction to Chinese pharmacy and dispensary practices, common OTC North American botanicals, the ethical consideration of utilizing sparse resources, and TCM clinical diet therapies. Information in the western botanical and pharmacy classes provides clear information regarding indications, contraindications and drug-herb interactions. The ethical and ecological impacts of TCM materia medica on the health of the individual and the world are explored. In addition, the two courses in dietetics and nutrition help the student understand the role of nutrition in patients’ health. (Note that the course in western nutrition is listed under Western Biomedicine: ANT 521 Nutrition.)

AHM 634 Dispensary Management.
This course will develop knowledge and skills related to TCM dispensary management. Students will learn how to support the clinical and health promotion work of the peripheral dispensary by keeping all needed support systems running well. 1 lecture credit, 18 hours. Prerequisites: none

AHM 635 Pharmacognosy and Pharmacology of Chinese Herbs.
Chinese material medical are often prescribed in complex formulae. Understanding the chemistry, interactions, extraction methodology, and drug interactions allows AOM practitioners better insights to possible adverse effects, from drug-herb interactions, herb toxicities to lack of expected (or any) outcomes from prescribed formulae. Several recorded incidents of adverse reactions have occurred to Chinese herbs over the past 12 years. In most cases, the incidents have involved multiple patients consuming the same or similar substance, rather than isolated case reports. It is important to review the unique aspects of Chinese medicine) which are of relevance to understanding these issues. 1 lecture credit, 18 hours. Prerequisites: ACH 523 Chinese Herbal Theories & Triple burner theories.

AHM 616 Ethical and ecological considerations of Chinese materia medica.
The traditional practice of using endangered species (plant and animal) is controversial within TCM. Comprehensive Chinese herbal textbooks often discuss substances derived from endangered species, emphasizing alternatives. Poaching and black market issues with animal products, particularly tiger bone, rhinoceros horn, seahorse and bear bile have all raised ethical and ecological concerns in the use of Traditional Chinese formulae. In this course, we will discuss the ethical and ecological impacts of TCM materia medica on the health of the individual and the world. 1 lecture credit, 18 hours. Prerequisites: none

AHM 613 TCM Dietetics.
This class introduces the student to the eastern understanding of how food influences human health. Foods and food products are surveyed according to Asian categorization. Food groups are categorized by nature, temperature, taste, element, indications and contraindications. Treatment of the major categories of organ (zang-fu) disorders using foods and food combinations are covered. Prerequisite: ADT 513 Oriental Diagnosis I. 2 lecture hours, 2 semester credits.

AHM 521: Botanical Medicine 1.
This course comprises a survey of plant and plant preparations most commonly used in Western traditions. The actions of the plant and plant products, as well as drug-herb interactions are considered. Prerequisites: ABS 515, ACS 611. 2 lecture hours, 2 semester credits.

Movement, Respiration and Bodywork Studies (AMR)

The seven (7) movement and respiration courses are designed to enhance the student’s personal and energetic development. The student will be exposed to a wide variety of Asian movement practices that can be used to maintain their own and their patients’ health care needs. In addition to the movement studies, two courses in soft tissue treatment techniques are offered.

AMR 511: Taijiquan 1.
This introductory course in therapeutic movement explores how musculoskeletal alignment, breathing, and mental awareness affect the meridians through practice of this traditional exercise. Prerequisite: none. 0 lecture hours, 1.5 laboratory hours, 1 semester credit.

AMR 522: Taijiquan 2.
This is a continuation of Taijiquan 1. Prerequisite: AMR 511 Tai Ji Chuan 1. 0 lecture hours, 1.5 laboratory hours, 1 semester credit.

AMR 613: Qigong 1.
This course teaches exercises designed to regulate specific meridians, muscles and joints as well as how to choose, integrate and teach the appropriate exercises in a clinic setting. Prerequisite: AMR 522: Taijiquan 2. 0 lecture hours, 1.5 laboratory hours, 1 semester credit.

AMR 624: Qigong 2.
This course is a continuation of Qi Gong 1. Prerequisite: AMR 613 Qi Gong 1. 0 lecture hours, 1.5 laboratory hours, 1 semester credit.

AMR 627: Tuina 1.
In this course, students integrate knowledge of anatomy with skills in palpation and massage. Introductory soft tissue technique is taught as a way to assess muscle, acupoints and meridians as well as provide a practical therapeutic treatment. Prerequisite: ABS 522 Anatomy 2. 1 lecture hour, 2 laboratory hours, 2 semester credits.

AMR 715: Tuina 2.
The student learns Tui Na soft tissue manipulation technique as well as its history, theory, application, and indications. Treatments for back pain and conditions of the upper limb are the primary focus. Prerequisite: ATD 513 Oriental Diagnosis 1 and APM 621: Palpation/Massage. 1 lecture hour, 2 laboratory hours, 2 semester credits.

AMR 726: Tuina 3.
This course is a continuation of Oriental Massage 1. Tui Na treatments for the lower leg and internal conditions are the primary focus. Prerequisite: AMR 715 Oriental Massage 1. 1 lecture hour, 2 laboratory hours, 2 semester credits.

Counseling, Communications and Practice Management

The three (3) specific courses in this area enhance the students’ clinical skills, both in terms of diagnosing addressing patients’ psychological health and in the area of best business practices. In addition, the courses of AWB 621 Medical Ethics, ACS 511 Evidence informed Clinical Practices help students learn the fundamental skills needed for private practice, ethical and legal considerations in health care. Additional courses in Clinical Procedures and Grand Rounds offer training for working in team-based care and practice in integrated care settings.

APS 621: Psychological Assessment.
The primary focus of this course is the diagnosis of the various psychiatric diseases according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Included are psychological assessment considerations and treatment modalities. Prerequisites: none. 2 lecture hours, 2 semester credits.

APP 721: Practice Management.
Students are taught the current procedural practices for the operation of a private practice. In addition, the practical aspects of operating a practice as a small business are discussed. Students are encouraged to begin thinking about their personal career path as a complementary medicine practitioner in private practice, group practice, hospital-based practice or as an AOM educator. Prerequisites: none. 2 lecture hours, 2 semester credits.

APP 722 Professional Development.
This course will explore the issues associated with ongoing professional development. Professional development assists the AOM practitioner to develop the knowledge and skills necessary to further clinical competence and contribute to the body of knowledge in the field during practice after graduation. Prerequisites: ACS 731 Clinic Procedures 1, ACS 631 Clinic 1. 1.5 lecture credits, 0 lab credits, 1.5 credits total.

Clinical Services (ACS)

The five (5) acupuncture clinical services courses, four (4) Chinese Herbology clinical services, and seven (7) Integrated clinical services courses (for a total of sixteen – 16 – clinical experience courses) are designed to allow the student to develop clinical, interpersonal communication and decision-making skills, along with the ability to work in multidisciplinary and integrated clinical locations. In addition, students learn professional conduct, efficiency and confidence in dealing with patients, patient-centered care and integrated clinical decision making skills. From inception through the end of clinical training, the student has the opportunity to observe and work with advanced TCM practitioners as well as a number of other health care professionals. This allows the student to understand how and when to make appropriate referrals. Clinical rotations are available in the UBAI on-campus clinic as well as in community and hospital outreach clinical sites. By the end of clinical training, each student will have seen a minimum of 875 patient visits and will have completed 1400 hours of clinical training (610 hours in the acupuncture/general clinical care; 360 in the herbology clinic, 430 integrative care clinical hours).

ACS 711: Preceptorship I.
The students observe and administer care in established acupuncture facilities under the supervision of licensed physicians and acupuncturists. This exposure to a variety of clinical settings helps prepare the student for both private practice and integrative patient care. Prerequisite: Completion of all first year courses. 0 lecture hours, 4 laboratory hours, 2 semester credits, 75 clock hours total.

ACS 722: Preceptorship II.
This is a continuation of ACS 671. Students increase their clinical skills working under a variety of health care professionals, all of whom must have the appropriate credentials to practice in the field of acupuncture. Prerequisite: ACS 671. 0 lecture hours, 4 laboratory hours, 2 semester credits, 75 clock hours total.

ACS 631 Clinical Education I.
Under the supervision of licensed faculty members, the interns start by observing patients for 30 clinic hours, then move into the area of direct patient care. All patient diagnoses and management plans are reviewed and approved by a clinic faculty member prior to the initiation of patient care. The student will begin to practice clean needle technique, removal and disposal of needles. The student will acquire proficiency in tongue and pulse diagnosis. Prerequisite: Pass Clinical Entrance Exam. 0 lecture hours, 12 laboratory hours, 8 semester credits, 245 clock hours total.

ACS 712 Clinical Education II.
Students continue to administer care to patients under the supervision of licensed faculty. Students are monitored as to their progress toward completing the qualitative and quantitative requirements necessary for the successful completion of the program. Eligibility for the rotation is successful completion of the previous clinical rotation. Prerequisite: ACS 631 Clinical Education 1. 0 lecture hours, 12 laboratory hours, 8 semester credits, 215 clock hours total.

ACS 723 Clinical Education III. (Optional for D-TCM students)
Students continue to administer care to patients under the supervision of licensed faculty. Students are monitored as to their progress toward completing the qualitative and quantitative requirements necessary for the successful completion of the program. Eligibility for the rotation is successful completion of the previous clinical rotation. Prerequisite: ACS 712 Clinical Education 2. 0 lecture hours, 12 laboratory hours, 8 semester credits, 220 clock hours total.

ACC: Clinical Education

The four (4) Chinese Herbology clinical services are designed to allow the student to develop clinical, interpersonal communication and decision-making skills. From inception through the end of clinical training, the student has the opportunity to observe and work with advanced TCM practitioners. Clinical rotations are available in the UBAI on-campus clinic as well as in community outreach clinical sites. By the end of clinical training, each student will have seen a minimum of 200 patient visits and will have completed 360 hours in the herbology clinic.

ACC 611 Chinese Herbal Clinic 1.
Under the supervision of licensed faculty members, the interns start by observing patients for 20 clinic hours, then move into the area of direct patient care. All patient diagnoses and management plans are reviewed and approved by a clinic faculty member prior to the initiation of patient care. The student will begin to prescribe individual herbs and formulae for patient care. The student will acquire proficiency in TCM diagnostic techniques, as well as in understanding when specific herbs or formulae may not be prescribed based upon possible herb-drug interactions. Prerequisite:. 0 lecture hours, 4 lab credits, 130 clock hours total.

ACC 632 Chinese Herbal Clinic 2A.
Students continue to administer Chinese herbal care to patients under the supervision of licensed faculty. Students are monitored as to their progress toward completing the qualitative and quantitative requirements necessary for the successful completion of the program. Eligibility for the rotation is successful completion of the previous clinical rotation. Prerequisite: ACC 611 Chinese Herbal Clinic 1. 0 lecture hours, 2 lab credits, 65 clock hours total.

ACC 723 Chinese Herbal Clinic 2B.
Students continue to administer Chinese herbal care to patients under the supervision of licensed faculty. Students are monitored as to their progress toward completing the qualitative and quantitative requirements necessary for the successful completion of the program. In addition to utilizing prepared formulae, student interns now begin to mix herbal powders in individualized formulae. Eligibility for the rotation is successful completion of the previous clinical rotation. Prerequisite: ACC 611 Chinese Herbal Clinic 1. Pre/Co-Requisite ACC 632 Chinese Herbal Clinic 2A. 0 lecture hours, 2 lab credits, 65 clock hours total.

ACC 724 Chinese Herbal Clinic 3.
Students continue to administer care to patients under the supervision of licensed faculty. Students will integrate herbal therapies with dietary advice and qi enhancement techniques. Students are monitored as to their progress toward completing the qualitative and quantitative requirements necessary for the successful completion of the program. Eligibility for the rotation is successful completion of the previous clinical rotation. Prerequisite: ACC 723 Chinese Herbal Clinic 2B. 0 lecture hours, 3 lab credits, 100 clock hours total.

Integrated Clinical Practice (AIC)

The seven (7) integrated medical clinical courses and rotations are designed to allow the student to develop clinical, interpersonal communication and decision-making skills. From inception through the end of clinical training, the student has the opportunity to observe and work with advanced TCM practitioners and practitioners from other medical and traditional medicine professions. Clinical rotations are available in the UBAI on-campus clinic as well as in community outreach clinical sites. By the end of clinical training, each student will have seen a minimum of 300 patient visits and will have completed 430 hours in integrative clinical rotations).

AIC 731 Clinical Procedures 1.
This course explores the clinical applications of the skills and knowledge learned to date for patient care in the UB Clinics. In addition, UB Clinics skills including using the electronic health system for charting, and communication with patients and other health providers in the UB Clinics is reviewed. 2 lecture credits, 0 lab credits, 2 credits total. Prerequisites: ACS 623 Clinical Dx 1, ATD 72 Case Studies 1, AWB 621 Medical Ethics.

AIC 714 Clinical Procedures 2.
This course explores the clinical applications of the skills and knowledge learned to date for patient care in multi-disciplinary care clinics and hospital settings. 2 lecture credits, 0 lab credits, 2 credits total. Prerequisites: ACS 731 Clinical Procedures 1, AIC 631 Clinic 1.

AIC 715 Physical and Functional Assessments of the UB Health Sciences.
This course is designed to teach the student general principles and practices of health care from the breadth of providers trained at the University of Bridgeport. The naturopathic, chiropractic, nutrition, dental hygiene and physician assistant history and scope of practice will be discussed. Practical applications of these disciplines in the area of physical and functional assessment of patients will be emphasized. Prerequisites: Clinical Dx 2, Lab Dx 1.

AIC 811 Grand Rounds 1.
This course is designed to train the AOM student to communicate effectively, orally and in writing, with patients and their families, colleagues, and others with whom health-professionals must exchange information in carrying out their responsibilities in patient care. Prerequisites: ACS 714 Clinic Procedures 2; ATD 715 TCM Internal Medicine; ACC 611 Chinese Herb Clinic 1. Co-requisite: AIC 812 Integrated Clinical Education 1. 2 lecture credits, 0 lab credits, 2 credits total.

AIC 823 Grand Rounds 2.
This course is designed to train the advanced AOM student to communicate with other health care providers to determine an appropriate plan of care. This includes the ability to assess written diagnostic reports, including the range of values that distinguish normal from abnormal findings, as relevant to patient care and communication with other health care providers. Upon completion, the student will be able to discuss the clinical scope of AOM in an informed, authoritative, and appropriate manner. Prerequisites: AIC 811 Grand Rounds 1; Co-requisite: AIC 814 Integrated Clinical Education 2. 2 lecture credits, 0 lab credits, 2 credits total.

AIC 812 Integrated Clinical Education 1.
Rotations in the Integrative clinic shifts combine AOM supervisors for AOM diagnosis and treatment with biomedical practitioners and other clinicians offering medical care in a variety of health settings. Students administer care to patients under the supervision of licensed faculty. Students are monitored as to their progress toward completing the qualitative and quantitative requirements necessary for the successful completion of the program. 215 hours; 150 patient visits; at least 90 hours in off-site clinics. Prerequisites: ACS 712 Clinical Education 2; ACC 632 Chinese Herbal Clinic 2A

AIC 814 Integrated Clinical Education 2.
This is a continuation of the integrative clinical training started in ACS 812. Rotations in the Integrative clinic shifts combine AOM supervisors for AOM diagnosis and treatment with biomedical practitioners and other clinicians offering medical care in a variety of health settings. Students continue to administer care to patients under the supervision of licensed faculty. Students are monitored as to their progress toward completing the qualitative and quantitative requirements necessary for the successful completion of the program. 215 hours; 150 patient visits; at least 90 hours in off-site clinics. Prerequisites: ACS 712 Clinical Education 2; ACC 632 Chinese Herbal Clinic 2A. AIC 812 Integrated Clinical Education 1.