Curriculum and Program Requirements


The Master of Science in Acupuncture degree program is 3 years in length (34 months) and is scheduled on a semester basis. The curriculum of this major consists of seven (7) distinct areas:

1. Acupuncture Practice and Techniques

The nine (9) acupuncture courses introduce students to the theoretical and practical information of acupuncture therapy. The student becomes proficient in the clinical applications of acupuncture, moxibustion, cupping, electrical stimulation, and bleeding techniques. The student learns to identify acupuncture points by anatomical location, palpation, and proportional measurement. The classification, function and indications for each acupuncture point are discussed and demonstrated. In addition to the twelve bilateral channels, two midline vessels and six other extra meridians, forbidden and contraindication of points are discussed. In addition, extra points, auricular points and other categories of acupuncture points are demonstrated and treatment techniques based on these extra meridians and points are discussed and practiced.

2. Asian Medicine Theory, Diagnosis and Application

The twelve (12) TCM medicine theory and diagnosis courses are designed to provide the student with an understanding of the scope, philosophy, theory and conceptual frame work of TCM medicine and how acupuncture specifically affects the body within the TCM treatment paradigms. Emphasis is placed on Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) diagnoses and effective treatment strategies.

3. Western Biomedicine

The twelve (12) western biomedical courses are designed to train the student fully about western medical terms, history taking, physical exam and diagnostic skills. The student learns how to make the appropriate referral and consultation, as well as the clinical relevance of laboratory and diagnostic tests and procedures.

4. Herbal Medicine Survey

The four (4) courses in herbal medicine and dietetics give the student a basic introduction to western and Chinese botanical medicine and TCM treatment philosophies relevant to herbal medicine and clinical diet therapies. Training in botanical medicine is limited in the Acupuncture Institute to three survey courses: Botanical Medicine, Introduction to Chinese Herbal Remedies and Patent Remedies. Information is provided on indications, contraindications and drug-herb interactions. In addition, the two courses in dietetics and nutrition help the student understand the role of nutrition in patients’ health. (Note that the course in western nutrition is listed under Western Biomedicine: ANT 521 Nutrition.)

5. Movement and Respiration Studies

The seven (7) movement and respiration courses are designed to enhance the student’s personal and energetic development. The student will be exposed to a wide variety of Asian movement practices that can be used to maintain their own and their patients’ health care needs. In addition to the movement studies, two courses in soft tissue treatment techniques are offered.

6. Counseling, Communications and Practice Management

The two (2) specific courses in this area enhance the students’ clinical skills, both in terms of diagnosing addressing patients’ psychological health and in the area of best business practices. In addition, the two second year seminars, cross referenced in the “TCM Theory, Diagnosis and Application” (ATD) section help students learn the fundamental skills needed for private practice, ethical and legal considerations in health care and special considerations for practice in integrated care settings.

7. Clinical Services

The five (5) clinical services courses are designed to allow the student to develop clinical, interpersonal communication and decision-making skills. In addition, students learn professional conduct, efficiency and confidence in dealing with patients on a regular basis. From inception through the end of clinical training, the student has the opportunity to observe and work with advanced TCM practitioners as well as other health care professionals. This allows the student to understand how and when to make appropriate referrals. Clinical service rotations are available in the UBAI on-campus clinic as well as in community and hospital outreach clinical sites. By the end of clinical training, each student will have seen a minimum of 380 patient visits and will have completed 830 hours of clinical training.



Asian Medicine Theory, Diagnosis and Application


TCM History & Philosophy 18
TCM Medical Theory 36
TCM Diagnosis I 36
TCM Diagnosis II 36
Seminar 1 18
Seminar 2 18
Seminar 3 18
Differential Dx and Pathomechanisms 36
TCM Internal Medicine 36
Case Study 1 18
Case Study Organization & Analysis 18
Acup. Gynecology 18
Advanced Pulse Tongue Diagnosis 18


Acupuncture Practice & Techniques


Point Location 1 45
Point Location 2 45
Meridian Theory 36
Acupuncture Techniques 1 72
Acupuncture Techniques 2 72
Auricular Acupuncture 18
TCM Safe Practices 54
Japanese Acupuncture Techniques 18
Pediatric Acupuncture Techniques 18


Acupuncture Related Studies


Taijiquan 1 27
Taijiquan 2 27
Qi Gong 1 27
Qi Gong 2 27
Tuina 1 54
Tuina 2 54
Tuina 3 54
TCM Dietetics 36
TOTAL: OM theory, diagnosis, treatment and
acupuncture related studies:


Herbal Medicine Survey


Botanical Medicine 36
Intro to Chinese Herbal Remedies 18
Patent Remedies 36


Western Basic & Biomedical Sciences


Anatomy 1 72
Anatomy 2 72
Physiology 1 36
Physiology 2 36
Pathology 1 36
Pathology 2 54
Clinical Diagnosis 1 90
Clinical Diagnosis 2 90
Lab Diagnosis 36
Public Health 36
Pharmacology 18
Western Nutrition 36


Counseling, Communications, Ethics, Practice MGT


Evidence Informed Practices 18
Medical Ethics 18
Psychological Assessment 36
Practice Management 36


Clinical Education


Preceptorship 1 75
Preceptorship 2 75
Clinical Education 1 245
Clinical Education 2 215
Clinical Education 3 220





The acupuncture curriculum consists of an intensive 34-month (six semesters, 2,645 hours) program of lecture and clinical courses. Practitioners learn the fundamental energetic principles, physiologic concepts, theoretical foundations, and diagnostic and therapeutic procedures of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Treatment modalities include acupuncture, manual therapy (Tui Na), diet counseling, nutrition, and exercise and breathing therapy (Taijiquan and Qi Gong). The clinical sciences incorporate Western anatomy, physiology and pathology and Western diagnostic interpretation. The combination of Eastern and Western philosophy and sciences is essential when working in conjunction with other health care providers.

During the first year of study, the practitioner gains philosophical background and biomedical knowledge that serves as preparation for clinical experience. The second year deepens the practitioner’s knowledge of Eastern and Western diagnostic skills and therapeutic modalities. During the third year, the curriculum is centered on hands-on learning in the student clinic where practitioners gain the clinical skills and experience necessary for state and national certification exams as well as entrance into private practice. Western biomedical classes are held during the day while classes devoted to Traditional Chinese Medicine medicine are held on selected evenings during the week and every other weekend.

The newly renovated Health Sciences Center provides a state-of-the-art environment where interns of acupuncture are able to perform their clinical rounds. These interns work independently and collaboratively with chiropractic and naturopathic interns, sharing training and treatment strategies that are advantageous in developing an integrated treatment model.

Research Facilities

The University of Bridgeport’s Magnus Wahlstrom Library supports student and faculty research in acupuncture and herbal medicine. The library houses more than 220,000 books and 50,700 bound periodical volumes and subscribes to approximately 440 continuations (i.e. book series). Alternative and Western medical database searching is available on computer terminals. The terminals access MANTIS, IBIS, Index to Chiropractic Literature, Alt-Health Watch, the Internet, LEXIS-NEXIS and MEDLINE (PubMed). One terminal accesses eighteen medical CD-ROMs. Books and journals are in the library’s Online Public Access Catalog. The library also provides a free interlibrary loan service for all students and faculty members. Resident halls are networked for individual computer hookups.

Class Size

Class size for incoming full-time classes will be limited to a maximum of 35 students.